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Informational

Homestead Funding was recently listed as the #1 Company to Work For by Mortgage Executive magazine! Each year, Mortgage Executive magazine, a nationally distributed trade publication, polls Loan Originators around the country to see how they rate the companies they work for.

Over 10,000 Loan Originators from over 200 companies were asked to rank their companies in areas like company culture, underwriting, marketing, technology. Based on the number of votes and the average scores, the magazine complies its list of the “50 Best Mortgage Companies to Work For.”

“We are honored to be named the best place to work by Mortgage Executive magazine,” said Jeff Mason, Human Resources Director for Homestead Funding.

This is the first time Homestead has been #1! For the past several years, Homestead has made the top five. We hope to continue this trend and make 2018 even better.


Informational

The Federal Reserve’s (the Fed) actions indirectly impact the prices you pay for gas, rent and even your groceries. For years, the prospect of a higher national interest rate has loomed over prospective homebuyers. Now that the Fed has decided to increase the federal interest rate in December of 2017, something that had not happened since the 2008 financial crisis, it’s important to understand how recent and future rate increases will affect mortgage rates.

Mortgage Interest Rates

We’ve already begun to see an increase in residential mortgage interest rates. The rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage hit 4% in 2017. Some analysts are projecting we could reach the 4.5-5% range in 2018. In other words, the longer buyers wait, the more expensive it may become to purchase a home.

There are several reasons for this, but one of the biggest is the federal funds rate. If the Fed thinks prices are rising too quickly, they raise interest rates. The Fed lowered the federal funds rate to stimulate the economy during the 2008 recession. That lowered interest rates and propped up the economy.

Whether you’re looking to purchase or refinance a mortgage, rates are relatively low at this point, historically speaking. If you’re on the fence, this is a great time to lock in a rate.

Refinancing and Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMs)

Many homeowners with adjustable rate home equity lines of credit may be affected. Unlike an adjustable rate mortgage, home equity loans will reset immediately rather than once each year. While it won’t be a drastic change in 2018, those concerned with the escalation of rates might want to consider converting the balance into a fixed rate option will rates are still relatively low.

HELOC Rates

Mortgage rates are not directly impacted by the federal funds rate, but the interest rate you can obtain on a home equity line of credit (HELOC) is. However, there are ways to manage home equity debt in an environment of rising rates. One option is to refinance into a fixed-rate home equity loan.

We understand that every financial situation is unique. No matter your situation, you can speak with a Licensed Loan Originator who can go over your scenario and give you the best possible options to help you out in 2018.


New Hires

Welcome Jude Satalino

Feb 1
11:18
AM
Category | New Hires

Homestead Funding would like to welcome Jude Satalino to our New Britain, CT sales team! Jude has been in the mortgage industry for 32 years. She was born and raised in New Britain, graduated from Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, CT and currently lives in Berlin.  Jude has served on several non-profit boards and has been a guest speaker at UCONN for an undergraduate course in real estate.

She understands that home buying is a stressful event and it is her goal to make it understandable and a smooth process.  Jude takes pride in helping people obtain their dream; whether it's their first home, last home or any home in between.

Jude says she is excited to join Homestead Funding because of their customer focus and their investment in the newest technology. 

To learn more about Jude visit her webpage

Welcome, Jude!


Informational

This delicious cheesecake is the perfect size for two people to share after a Valentine’s Day meal. It is made in a 4-inch spring form pan. If you don’t have one, feel free to skip the crust and just use the filling to make individual cheesecakes with already made pie crusts.

Ingredients:

For the Cheesecake

  • 8 oz cream cheese (room temperature)
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg (room temperature)
  • 1 tsp vanilla

For the Crust

  • ¼ cup graham cracker crumbs (you could also use biscotti, chocolate wafer cookies, or whatever you like)
  • ½ tbsp melted butter

For the Strawberry Syrup*

  • ½ cup water 
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp corn starch
  • 1/8 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries (thawed)

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Press graham cracker mixture into bottom of 4 inch springform pan and bake for 5 – 7 minutes.
  3. While the crust is baking, beat the cream cheese until smooth. Beat in the sugar, then the vanilla, and then the egg. Make sure to scrape the sides so everything is incorporated.
  4. Pour into 4 inch springform pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes until the edges are lightly golden and the middle still has a wiggle to it. Turn the oven off and leave the cheesecake in with the door closed for a half hour. Take the cheesecake out and leave it on the counter 10 minutes. Before putting it in the refrigerator, gently run a thin knife between the edges of the pan and the cheesecake. Cover and refrigerate for at least four hours before serving.
  5. Before serving the cheesecake, combine the water, sugar, and corn starch in a small saucepan over medium low heat. Stir continuously until fully combined.
  6. Add the vanilla extract and strawberries. Continue to cook, breaking up the strawberries slightly until the sauce is the consistency you want.
  7. Remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly before topping the cheesecake and serving.

 

*You can also buy strawberry syrup at the store to save time, or just top instead with fresh strawberries.


Branches

 

 

The History of Thanksgiving … and What was on the Menu

In September of 1620, the Mayflower left England with 102 passengers aboard. Following a perilous 66-day journey across the Atlantic Ocean, the Mayflower dropped anchor near current day Cape Cod. The following year, the colonists encountered an English-speaking Native American named Squanto. Thanks to Squanto and the Wampanoag tribe, the colonists learned to harvest the land and natural resources of New England, which lead to a group celebration.

The history of Thanksgiving as we know it can be traced back to 1621, when colonists in Plymouth shared an autumn harvest feast with the Wampanoag tribe. In the two centuries that followed that feast, Thanksgiving was celebrated on a state level. That changed in 1863 when President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving Day to be a national holiday.

You might think that what we eat today at a traditional Thanksgiving meal is just like what they served at the original holiday, but there have been some big changes over the years!

What was Served at the Original Thanksgiving?

Turkey, stuffing, apple pie, friends and family around the table - what’s not to love about Thanksgiving? Here’s what culinary historians (yes, there’s such a thing!) have to say was on the menu.

Turkey (and other birds) – Entries from Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow’s journal from 1621 tells us that William Bradford, the governor of Plymouth, sent four men on a “fowling mission” to prepare for the event. Wild turkey was common in the Plymouth area and a popular food source for early colonists. It’s also more than likely that the hunters returned with other birds, such as ducks and even swans!

Fruits and Vegetables – Local produce that likely appeared at the Thanksgiving table in 1621 were vegetables such as onions, lettuce, spinach, carrots, and cabbage. There was also corn, but instead of corn on the cob, kernels were removed from the cob, turned into cornmeal, then boiled into a thick porridge. Fruits commonly found in the area that were likely served were plums, blueberries, grapes, and cranberries.

Seafood – Historians believe that much of the original Thanksgiving menu was actually seafood based. Mussels were an abundant source of food off the Massachusetts shore. Lobster, clams, and oysters were also likely part of the feast.

Potatoes – A must-have for many Americans today, potatoes were not actually present! Potatoes are native to South America, and the Spanish introduced them to Europeans in 1570. But when the colonists boarded the Mayflower, potatoes had not yet become a staple in the European diet.

Pumpkins – Historians have noted that the Pilgrims and members of the Wampanoag tribe ate pumpkins and other squashes native to New England. However, they did not have pumpkin pie. The colonists lacked the sugar and flour necessary to bake a pie and on top of that, they didn’t have ovens! Colonists improvised by hollowing out the pumpkin, filling it with milk and honey to create a custard.

This year when you sit down at the table for your Thanksgiving feast, take a minute to think of the colonists and the Wampanoag tribe and thank them for the tradition they started back in 1621. And be thankful you have real pumpkin pie!

 


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